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How to Evict a Tenant in Puerto Rico

How to Evict a Tenant in Puerto Rico


How to Evict a Tenant in Puerto Rico

Many landlords who have received late rent payments or observed their tenants breaching a lease need to know how to evict a tenant in PR.  Knowing how to evict a tenant in Puerto Rico is critical for all landlords so that they can protect their rights to their property.  This guide will teach you how to evict a tenant in PR properly so that you are not taken advantage of by a tenant or fined by the courts.  For more information on how to evict a tenant in Puerto Rico, you may want to talk to a landlord tenant attorney.

Step 1: Provide Notice if Required

The first step in how to evict a tenant in PR legally is to check the lease documents that you and your tenant signed before the tenant moved in.  If notice is required by your lease, you will need to give your tenant the appropriate notice before filing any eviction lawsuit in court.  Not all lease agreements will require notice.  Generally, you will have to be able to provide proof that your tenant is violating the lease in a material way in order to begin eviction proceedings.  Damage to a unit is not considered a cause for eviction unless the damage goes beyond normal wear and tear.

Step 2: File a Lawsuit

Some landlords who do not know how to evict a tenant in Puerto Rico assume that they can simply change the tenant's locks, throw the tenant's belongings out of the unit, or turn off the tenant's electricity, water, or other utilities.  These steps are considered “self help” methods, and are illegal.  The only legal answer to the question of how to evict a tenant in PR is to go through the court system.

If you go to your local courthouse and ask how to evict a tenant in Puerto Rico, you will be directed to the forms that can help you to file a lawsuit.  Alternately, you may wish to talk to an attorney who can tell you how to evict a tenant in PR in more detail, and who may be able to file all court paperwork for you.

Step 3: Eviction Hearing

Your tenant will be provided with notice of his or her eviction hearing by the courthouse or through a private process server.  If you do not know how to evict a tenant in Puerto Rico, having the assistance of an attorney at the hearing may be useful.  Many tenants will simply vacate the premises once they receive an eviction notice, but if you must attend the hearing, you will need to show that your tenant violated his or her lease.

Tenants may be able to show that your obligations as a landlord were not being met, and this will often lead to the judge ruling in favor of tenants.  It is important to have an attorney who understands how to evict a tenant in PR even if the tenant fights the eviction.

Step 4: Removal

Only after these other steps have been followed can a landlord have a tenant legally evicted.  Once the eviction hearing is over, if the court rules in the landlord's favor, the tenant will be served with papers that indicate when they must leave by.  If the tenant has not vacated the premises, they may be removed forcibly and can be arrested for trespassing on the landlord's property if they refuse to leave.

 

West Virginia Landlord Tenant Law

West Virginia Landlord Tenant Law

 

Quick Guide to WV Landlord/Tenant Law 

Sources for West Virginia Landlord/Tenant Law

There are two public resources that provide valuable information about some of the most important West Virginia landlord/tenant laws: the Huntington Human Relations Commission and the state’s revised code.  A large amount of information about a specific West Virginia landlord/tenant laws in this article is referenced from the revised code, but you can find more information about other WV landlord/tenant law at the following link under the HHRC: 

Landlord’s Maintenance under West Virginia Landlord/Tenant Law

West Virginia landlord/tenant laws for maintenance from the landlord are provided under §37-6-30.  This particular section of West Virginia landlord/tenant law states a landlord is responsible for all of the following: 

• render and deliver the unit and surrounding premises in fit and habitable condition while providing maintenance when needed according to other WV landlord/tenant law

• maintain the property to meet all requirements under West Virginia landlord/tenant law as well as applicable health, fire, and housing codes

• keep all common areas within multiple housing units clean, safe, and in repair 

• make all repairs as necessary to the WV landlord/tenant law unless the damages were a direct result of the tenants negligence or direct fault 

• maintain and keep all electrical, plumbing, sanitary, heating, ventilating, air-conditioning, and other appliances safe (including elevators)

• provide and maintain all trash receptacles for ashes, garbage, rubbish, and other trash 

• provide running water, reasonable amounts of hot water, and reasonable amounts of heat between October and the last day of April unless a lease in accordance with West Virginia landlord/tenant laws provides the renter must provide such services

Tenant’s Responsibilities under West Virginia Landlord/Tenant Law

There are no specific West Virginia landlord/tenant laws that address certain tenant responsibilities.  A tenant must regard all factors established within a lease according to WV landlord/tenant law, and generally, a tenant is responsible for the following: 

• comply with all state and local housing codes under West Virginia landlord/tenant law that affect health and safety 

• keep the premises as clean and safe as the property allows, and return the premises to the landlord in the same condition as when the tenant moved except for normal wear and tear according to WV landlord/tenant law

• dispose of all trash in a clean and safe manner

• keep plumbing fixtures clean and in working condition 

• use all utilities correctly

• keep from deliberately destroying or allowing anyone else to destroy property

• keep from disturbing neighbors’ peace and sounds laws according to local West Virginia landlord/tenant law

There are other duties as far as rent under West Virginia landlord/tenant laws, and these requirements are located in the state’s revised code.  

Termination of Tenancy in Regard to West Virginia Landlord/Tenant Laws

According to §37-6-5 of the WV landlord/tenant law, either party must give a notice of termination three months before the end of a year-long lease.  This West Virginia landlord/tenant law does not apply in certain situations though.  

For more information on WV landlord/tenant law, visit the article on this website titled, “Quick Guide to WV Tenant Rights.”   You will find information about West Virginia landlord/tenant laws on security deposits, unlawful entrance, and more.  

 

Pennsylvania Tenant Rights

Pennsylvania Tenant Rights

 

Guide to Pennsylvania Tenant Rights

If you are renting a home or apartment in the state of Pennsylvania, your rights as a tenant are protected by state (and sometimes local) laws.  Understanding PA tenant rights can help you stand up to a landlord who isn't living up to the terms of your lease.  This guide will explain some of your Pennsylvania tenant rights, as well as what you can do if you find that your landlord is violating your rights under the law.

Eviction

PA tenant rights require landlords to give notice before beginning the eviction process in court.  If you are being evicted due to a breach of your lease or a failure to pay rent on time, you may wish to consult with a Pennsylvania tenant rights attorney.  The only way a landlord is allowed to evict a tenant is through the legal, court process—PA tenant rights do not permit so-called “self help evictions.”  If your landlord is attempting to personally evict you by changing your locks, putting your belongings outside, or shutting off your utilities, you may be able to take them to court and win damages.

Habitability

When you rent an apartment, according to your Pennsylvania tenant rights, it must be habitable.  This means that it must have safe, drinkable hot and cold running water, functioning plumbing and sanitary systems, and electricity.  Your appliances should be in good working condition and the unit should be free from pests or your landlord is renting a dwelling that violates your PA tenant rights.

According to Pennsylvania tenant rights, landlords must make needed repairs to your property when necessary.  If your landlord is refusing to make your unit habitable, you can talk to your local Department of Health to have an inspection performed.  If your landlord does not respond to Department of Health requests to repair the issues, PA tenant rights allow you to withhold rent.  You may not withhold rent without Department of Health permission according to your Pennsylvania tenant rights.

If you have provided your landlord with notice about the habitability issues and it is an issue you can repair yourself, you may fix the problem yourself if your landlord does not respond.  PA tenant rights then allow you to deduct the costs of the repair from your rent.  You will need to provide receipts to your landlord.

Quiet Enjoyment

You have the right to enjoy your property and not have your landlord interfere with that enjoyment unless it is necessary.  Pennsylvania tenant rights allow landlords to enter a dwelling only for repairs or inspections, and only after providing reasonable notice.  Your landlord may enter your apartment without violating your PA tenant rights if emergency repairs are needed and giving notice would lead to further damage to possessions or danger to tenants.

Security Deposits

If your landlord has asked you to pay a security deposit, Pennsylvania tenant rights require that they give it back to you within 30 days of moving out.  If some of the deposit is used for repairs, your landlord is required to tell you what damage was done and what money was kept.  Landlords may not collect more than two months of rent as a security deposit.

 

Guide to Pennsylvania Tenant Rights

If you are renting a home or apartment in the state of Pennsylvania, your rights as a tenant are protected by state (and sometimes local) laws.  Understanding PA tenant rights can help you stand up to a landlord who isn't living up to the terms of your lease.  This guide will explain some of your Pennsylvania tenant rights, as well as what you can do if you find that your landlord is violating your rights under the law.

Eviction

PA tenant rights require landlords to give notice before beginning the eviction process in court.  If you are being evicted due to a breach of your lease or a failure to pay rent on time, you may wish to consult with a Pennsylvania tenant rights attorney.  The only way a landlord is allowed to evict a tenant is through the legal, court process—PA tenant rights do not permit so-called “self help evictions.”  If your landlord is attempting to personally evict you by changing your locks, putting your belongings outside, or shutting off your utilities, you may be able to take them to court and win damages.

Habitability

When you rent an apartment, according to your Pennsylvania tenant rights, it must be habitable.  This means that it must have safe, drinkable hot and cold running water, functioning plumbing and sanitary systems, and electricity.  Your appliances should be in good working condition and the unit should be free from pests or your landlord is renting a dwelling that violates your PA tenant rights.

According to Pennsylvania tenant rights, landlords must make needed repairs to your property when necessary.  If your landlord is refusing to make your unit habitable, you can talk to your local Department of Health to have an inspection performed.  If your landlord does not respond to Department of Health requests to repair the issues, PA tenant rights allow you to withhold rent.  You may not withhold rent without Department of Health permission according to your Pennsylvania tenant rights.

If you have provided your landlord with notice about the habitability issues and it is an issue you can repair yourself, you may fix the problem yourself if your landlord does not respond.  PA tenant rights then allow you to deduct the costs of the repair from your rent.  You will need to provide receipts to your landlord.

Quiet Enjoyment

You have the right to enjoy your property and not have your landlord interfere with that enjoyment unless it is necessary.  Pennsylvania tenant rights allow landlords to enter a dwelling only for repairs or inspections, and only after providing reasonable notice.  Your landlord may enter your apartment without violating your PA tenant rights if emergency repairs are needed and giving notice would lead to further damage to possessions or danger to tenants.

Security Deposits

If your landlord has asked you to pay a security deposit, Pennsylvania tenant rights require that they give it back to you within 30 days of moving out.  If some of the deposit is used for repairs, your landlord is required to tell you what damage was done and what money was kept.  Landlords may not collect more than two months of rent as a security deposit.

 

Delaware Landlord Tenant Law

Delaware Landlord Tenant Law

 

Frequently Asked Questions About Delaware Landlord Tenant Law

What is Delaware Landlord Tenant Law?

Delaware Landlord Tenant Law regulates relations between landlords and tenants in the state of Delaware. This is, after all, a curious relationship in which both parties are mutually dependent on each other, but both are vulnerable to the other’s carelessness. Delaware Landlord Tenant Law attempts to make sure each group treats the other fairly by establishing what fair is.

There are two sources for Delaware Landlord Tenant Law. The first and the most important is the Residential Landlord-Tenant Code, which applies to both private commercial landlords and to the actions of supplies of subsidized housing rentals. The other source is the Mobile Home Lots and Leases Act.

What does Delaware Landlord Tenant Law say about security deposits?

The amount that your landlord can charge you as a security deposit depends, according to Delaware Landlord Tenant Law, upon the length of your lease. If your lease for one year or more, then your landlord cannot charge you more than one month’s rent as a security deposit.

However, there is not such limit if the lease is for less than one year according to Delaware Landlord Tenant Law. This does lead to the somewhat bizarre legal situation of a landlord charging for more than one month’s rent as a security deposit, and then their tenant staying for more than one year. After the first year of rental is over, according to Delaware Landlord Tenant Law, the landlord must refund the tenant the portion of their security deposit which was in excess of one month’s rent.

Once you pay your landlord your security deposit, they are supposed to put it into an escrow account according to Delaware Landlord Tenant Law. The location of the escrow account must be revealed to you if you inquire, but the landlord may take up to twenty days to tell you the location of the escrow account. Delaware Landlord Tenant Law says that if the landlord does not reveal the location, then they automatically forfeit their rights to the security deposit.

What does Delaware Landlord Tenant Law say about application fees?

Delaware Landlord Tenant Law does allow for landlords to charge their clients an application fee, which is different from a security deposit. An application fees is meant to allow a landlord to determine the credit of a prospective tenant. According to Delaware Landlord Tenant Law, this application fee may not exceed 10% of the monthly rent, and, if the monthly rent is more than $500, then the most than an application fee can be is $50.

What does Delaware Landlord Tenant Law say about evictions?

Quite a bit, of course, but the most important thing to take away is that a landlord who evicts a tenant without a valid court order from the Justices of the Peace is in violation of Delaware Landlord Tenant Law. Before taking court action, a landlord must send the tenant a termination notice, or else they cannot proceed with eviction according to Delaware Landlord Tenant Law.

 

How to Evict a Tenant in Alaska

Alaska Landlord Tenant Law

Alaska Landlord Tenant Law

 

Frequently Asked Questions about Alaska Landlord Tenant Law

What is Alaska landlord-tenant law?

In 2010, the Alaska legislature passed the Alaska Landlord & Tenant Act, a landmark piece of legislation which codified all of the state’s laws governing rental properties. Individuals are often taken advantage of in landlord-tenant relationships, so Alaska landlord-tenant law is an essential resource and defense for the thousands of renters and property-owners in the state, a resource that you can’t afford to ignore. Here are some of the most helpful concepts of Alaska landlord-tenant law.

What should I do once I move in?

The most essential aspect to a landlord-tenant relationship should be an agreement signed by both parties at the inception of the relationship, called sometimes a Rental Agreement, Tenant Agreement, or a lease. This document will include important information that will affect all further interactions between the parties, in particular the following:

• The identities of the parties;

• The amount of rent that will be charged, when it will be due, and who it will be paid to;

• Whether a security deposit is required and what the conditions will be for its return;

• The duration of the lease;

• After what period of time rent is considered delinquent, and whether a fine will be inflicted for delinquent rent, and how much such a fine would be;

• Which utilities and services will be paid for by the landlord;

• Whether any items are prohibited from the premises;

• What the repair responsibilities will be of the landlord;

• Whether the apartment can be sublet.

Sometimes, one party will forget to sign an agreement, but this doesn’t automatically disqualify it altogether. Instead, Alaska landlord-tenant law still respects agreements that are only signed by one party, so long as the tenant moved in according to schedule and paid rent that their landlord accepted.

What is a security deposit?

A security deposit is a perfectly acceptable institution according to Alaska landlord-tenant law. Its purposes are to compensate the landlord if their tenant moves out without repairing damage that they’ve done to their landlord’s property, or if they do not properly clean up the property prior to moving. 

There are strict aspects of Alaska landlord-tenant law detailing what a landlord may do with security deposits, which is deposit them in a trust account, savings account, or with a licensed escrow agent. It must be a separate account from any of the landlord’s other personal or business accounts, and detailed receipts must be kept showing all of a landlord’s deposits and withdrawals from such an account.

What if a landlord doesn’t comply with Alaska landlord-tenant law?

If a landlord refuses to fix their property as per the rental agreement or to provide an adequate place of living, then they’ve terminated the rental agreement and the tenant may move. In order for this to occur properly, the tenant must send a written notice to their landlord, stating that if changes aren’t made within ten days, they will move in twenty days. The tenant may also sue the landlord for non-compliance.

 

How to Evict a Tenant in South Dakota

How to Evict a Tenant in South Dakota

 

How to Evict a Tenant in South Dakota

It is important that every landlord knows very carefully how to evict a tenant in South Dakota, since one simple violation of the process can undo the whole eviction and even result in a huge fine. Make sure that you maintain your rights to your own legal property by following these simple rules.

A step-by-step guide showing how to evict a tenant in South Dakota:

1.  Ascertain that the tenant is in violation of the rental agreement. For most landlords, this means that the tenant hasn’t been paying their rent on time. Yet landlords who know how to evict a tenant in South Dakota from experience can tell you that there are many reasons that eviction may be necessary, like the tenant disregarding local law. If the rental agreement no longer applies but the tenant has continued to rent on a month-to-month basis, the landlord may desire to evict their tenant in order to repurpose the property. Obviously, mutually agreed-upon terms and friendly negotiation should be sought in such a circumstance and not eviction.

2. Notice must be given to the tenant. At minimum, three days notice must be given before further action is taken. 

3. File a lawsuit. This step should only taken if the tenant has not taken any steps to move their property out of the premises. If this is the case, the next document a landlord who knows how to evict a tenant in South Dakota will obtain is called a Forcible Entry and Detainer form, which will be turned into the court, requesting eviction.

4. Serve the tenant with the lawsuit. Note that if you want to successfully show how to evict a tenant in South Dakota, you will have to serve them with the actual papers. A phone call will not work. You can, however, hire an official called a process server to perform this step for you.

5. Tenant has four days to answer. The next step depends entirely on whether the tenant does, in fact, file an answer. If not, then they will be given a court order requiring them to move.

6. A hearing occurs. Note that this only occurs if the tenant files an answer to your Forcible Entry and Detainer form. At the hearing, the landlord will need to present their reasons for eviction and show that they’ve thus far accurately followed the rules for how to evict a tenant in South Dakota.

There are a few major mistakes which landlords make that are most definitely not how to evict a tenant in South Dakota. For instance, we are all familiar with the image of a tenant who is locked out of their apartment because the locks have been changed. However, a landlord never has the right to just lock a tenant out of their property, or to shut off essential utilities such as electricity, gas or water. If a landlord does so, their action is illegal, and the tenant may sever the rental agreement automatically. 

 

South Dakota Landlord Tenant Law

South Dakota Landlord Tenant Law

 

Frequently Asked Questions about South Dakota landlord Tenant Law

What is South Dakota landlord tenant law?

The rules concerning the relationship between South Dakota landlords and their tenants are prescribed in  South Dakota landlord tenant law . The rights of both parties are explicitly outlined in these codes, so it’d be best if you familiarize yourself with them as much as possible. You can read the original laws here. But if you’d prefer, see below for answers to some of the most popular questions about  South Dakota landlord tenant law .

What is a rental agreement?

The rental agreement is the foundation for any landlord-tenant relationship. It should lay out the all of the following terms of the leasing:

• Period of rental;

• Amount of rent due;

• Date that rent will be due;

• Consequences for late payment of rent;

• Security deposit amount;

• Method for reclaiming security deposit;

• Landlord’s duties and responsibilities;

• Pet policy;

• Yard care and house up-keep.;

A rental agreement may be either written or verbal, as  South Dakota landlord tenant law  respects both. However, since verbal agreements are easy to dispute, it is always better to have your rental agreement in writing. If you cancel your rental agreement, this will need to be done in writing, not verbally.

Can anything be in a rental agreement?

The truth is that  South Dakota landlord tenant law  actually prohibits many elements from being included in any rental agreement, as they violate an individual’s rights. These include clauses stating:

• That the landlord cannot be responsible for damage or personal injury;

• That the tenant automatically accepts responsibility for all damages to rented property;

• That the landlord can enter the apartment at will without notice;

• That the landlord can evict you without notice;

• That the landlord can take your property for not paying rent;

• That the landlord can keep the security deposit without giving a reason.

What is an application fee?

An application fee is a perfectly acceptable billing concept according to  South Dakota landlord tenant law . The payment goes toward the cost of speaking to the tenant’s references. Most fees are fifty dollars or less, but there are no clauses in  South Dakota landlord tenant law  defining egregious application fees.

What does  South Dakota landlord tenant law  say about security deposits?

A security deposit is charged to a tenant to compensate the landlord in case the tenant damages their apartment beyond reasonable wear and tear. A tenant does have the right to inspect a premises before paying a security deposit, and then to request a statement concerning the current state of the premises be signed by their landlord.

The typical security deposit is one month’s rent, and  South Dakota landlord tenant law  forbids larger amounts except in special circumstances, such as when the tenant has a pet. 

The landlord may retain the security deposit, but only that portion necessary to repair the tenant’s damage to the premises. Security deposits charged or kept in bad faith are subject to a $200 fine.

 

Oklahoma Landlord Tenant Law

Oklahoma Landlord Tenant Law

 

Guide to Oklahoma Landlord Tenant Law

If you are a renter or a landlord in Oklahoma, you need to have an understanding of OK landlord tenant law in order to ensure that your rights are respected.  Oklahoma landlord tenant law can be somewhat complicated, but gives a variety of protections to both tenants and landlords.  This guide will explain some aspects of OK landlord tenant law so that you can understand if your rights have been violated.  If you believe your landlord or tenant has violated OK landlord tenant law, you may wish to consult with a landlord tenant law attorney.

Oklahoma Landlord Tenant Law and Security Deposits

While in many states, a landlord must always return a security deposit promptly, Oklahoma landlord tenant law only requires a landlord to give back a security deposit after a written request from a tenant.  If you do not make this request within six months, OK landlord tenant law allows your landlord to keep the deposit.  According to Oklahoma landlord tenant law, landlords must maintain your security deposit separately from their own funds and must return it within 30 days of your request or give you an itemized list of damages.

Oklahoma Landlord Tenant Law and Evictions

OK landlord tenant law forbids “self help” evictions, in which a landlord personally evicts a tenant.  Some of the methods banned by state law include turning off utilities, changing a tenant's locks, or removing a tenant's belongings from their unit.  OK landlord tenant law only allows a landlord to evict a tenant by going through the legal eviction process in civil court.  If your landlord is attempting to remove you in any other way, you should contact a landlord tenant lawyer immediately.

Oklahoma Landlord Tenant Law and Habitability

OK landlord tenant law requires that all landlords maintain units at standards suitable for human habitation.  This means that your unit is required to have functional heating, electrical, and plumbing systems, and that you must have access to safe hot and cold drinking water.  All of a unit's appliances, including air conditioning units, must be maintained in good condition according to OK landlord tenant law, and your landlord must also provide trash removal.

Oklahoma Landlord Tenant Law and Lease Breaches

If your landlord does not maintain habitability standards or otherwise breaches your lease, you have several options.  OK landlord tenant law allows a tenant to give a landlord 14 days of notice to fix a problem, and if the problem is not fixed, the tenant may leave 30 days after giving the original notice.  You may also spend money yourself to fix the problem and withhold it from rent, if the cost of the repair is no more than $100.

Any problems that cause safety hazards or an imminent threat to your health allow you to terminate your lease immediately upon written notice, according to OK landlord tenant law.  Unsafe conditions caused by an emergency (like a fire) require a week of written notice before your tenancy can come to an end.

 

Nebraska Tenant Rights

Nebraska Tenant Rights

 

Quick Guide to NE Tenant Rights

Nebraska Tenant Rights

There are two public resources that provide valuable information about some of the most important sections of NE tenant rights under state law: the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the state’s revised statutes.  The majority of information about a specific Nebraska tenant right in this article is referenced from the revised statutes, but you can find more information under HUD at the following link

Obligations of Landlord according to Nebraska Tenant Rights

A Nebraska tenant right gives specific responsibilities to the landlord under NRS 76-1419.  This section of law on maintenance requirements for NE tenant rights states a landlord is responsible for all of the following: 

• comply with all local laws and Nebraska tenant rights that addresses housing, health, and safety codes

• make all repairs and do whatever is necessary to keep the premises in habitable condition

• keep all the common areas in clean and safe condition

• maintain all electrical, plumbing, sanitary, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and other appliances in safe working condition required by local law and NE tenant rights

• provide and maintain receptacles for removal of ashes, garbage, rubbish, and other waste as required by local laws and a Nebraska tenant right

• supply running water and reasonable amounts of hot water, as well as heat unless local law makes providing heat a Nebraska tenant right of duty

Various laws and Nebraska tenant rights allow the landlord and tenant to change responsibilities within the lease.  However, any changes within a lease and shifted responsibilities must still meet other sections of state law and Nebraska tenant rights.  

Nebraska Tenant Right against Entering of Landlord

§76-1423 covers NE tenant rights against a landlord entering the premises without permission.  There is no Nebraska tenant right that allows the tenant to deny entrance for necessary repairs and inspection, nor can the tenant deny entrance in the case of an emergency.  

Otherwise, Nebraska tenant rights require the landlord to notify the tenant a day before entering the premises.  However, the landlord does not need to respect this Nebraska tenant right if a tenant has abandoned or surrendered the premises.  

Nebraska Tenant Rights against Noncompliance from the Landlord

Nebraska tenant rights under §76-1425 states a tenant can terminate their tenancy within 30 days of a landlord failing to remedy a breach of lease agreements affecting NE tenant rights in health and safety.

If the landlord has fixed the breach of a Nebraska tenant right but makes the same breach within 6 months, a tenant may terminate their tenancy after 14 days of the landlord failing to fix the same problem.  

You can find information about NE tenant rights in security deposits and evictions within the statutes or within the article on this website titled, “Quick Guide to NE Landlord/Tenant Law.”  You can find more information about a specific Nebraska tenant right within the article listed above as well.